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Featured in the: Daily News Tweed Bulletin ~ Gold Coast Bulletin Tweed Weekly ~ ABC Radio 92.5 Gold FM ~ Today Tonite 

 Writing Awards: Poetry ~ Magazines ~ Short Stories ~ Innovation Award  Amazon Bestseller

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Praised by lumiaries: Hazel Hawke ~ Maggie Tabberer Paul Mecurio Paulo Coelho ~ Jules Watson ~ 

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Redundancy: Pleonasm Or Tautology (When Good Writing Turns Bad) I have engaged in a number of proofreads and edits in the recent weeks and apart from clichés, passive voice, typos and grammatical issues such as pronoun, comma and apostrophe, semi colon/colon misuse, the most common correction is the not-so-known redundancy. How do I know redundancy is not-so-known? Because the author says so. With a hint of surprise, maybe disappointment, they say, “Really? Never heard of it.” What Is Redundancy? Redundancy (in writing terminology) is the adding of words or phrases that add nothing to the overall text meaning because their gist has already been expressed. A a redundancy exhibits through: Pleonasm (Greek word that means excess) using more words than necessary and one or more words are redundant because the meaning is implicit. For example, I saw with my own eyes.  Tautology (Greek word tauto (the same) and logos (a word or an idea) a repetition...
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My characters and their hoofing styles Second to dialogue, creating the characters is a fave part of my writing processes. When I write I visualise my characters and form a pretty good image of what they look like; their facial features, height, body size and shape, colour of eyes and hair, what they wear, how their face expresses emotions, their unique behavioural habits – and it all has to match their dialogue and name. And this has to... HAS TO ... match the way they walk. The characters in my current book are fairly well defined – except their walk. So, I set myself up at a café and watched a world of emotions go by in the passerbyers strides. My first subject was a male in his early 40s. He walked legs slightly bandied, arms buffed out to the side as if to hold a barrel under each. He...

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